Friday, October 2, 2015

October 2 and the 10th Day





Now I want you to sing it LOUD

On the Tenth day of Autumn My true love gave to me…

Ten Stalks of Corn
Nine Spooky Cookies
Eight Salted Caramels
Seven Crunchy Leaves
Six Pumpkin donuts

Five G O L D E N Gourds

Four Halloween Oreos
Three caramel apples
Two Candy corn  aND

An Acorn from an old oak tree

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Image result for autumn quotes

Image result for autumn quotes

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How about some sweet treats?
candy-corn-pretzel-bark-0

              Candy Corn and Pretzel Bark


INGREDIENTS

  1. 1/2pound white chocolate, chopped
  2. 1cup miniature pretzels
  3. 1/2cup candy corn
  4. 1/3cup dried cranberries

DIRECTIONS

  1. Line an 8-inch square baking pan with parchment, leaving an overhang on 2 sides.
  2. Heat the chocolate in a double boiler or medium heatproof bowl set over (but not in) a saucepan of simmering water, stirring often, until melted and smooth.
  3. Spread the chocolate in the prepared pan and sprinkle with the pretzels, candy corn, and dried cranberries. Chill until firm, about 1 hour.
  4. Remove the bark from the pan and break into pieces.

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More things to celebrate this month
  • Seafood Month
  • International Drum Month
  • Cookie Month
  • The 2nd of October is 



World Smile Day first Friday of month

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  • Yellow tallow candles hanging above trough, as in the 1800s

Tallow candles & Snuffers

Candle wicks dipped in beef or mutton tallow


Selling bundles of candles depicted in medieval illustration

http://www.oldandinteresting.com/tallow-candles-snuffers.aspx

Tallow candles don't sound good to us - a sooty wick burning in animal fat - but for centuries they were a reliable way of having some light after dark. In a small home the fire in the hearth was often a major source of light, but you could brighten up different areas, and even have a light you could carry from place to place if you had a candle in a portable holder.

The quality of a candle depended on the fat that was used. The better the quality of the fat, the firmer and less offensive was the candle. New England settlers were fortunate to discover that the waxy berries from the bayberry bush made very pleasant candles. ...Peter Kalm wrote...in 1748...There is a plant here from which they make ...wax...Candles of this do not easily bend, nor melt in summer...nor do they cause any smoke, but yield rather an agreeable smell when they are extinguished."
J and D Volo, Daily Life on the Old Colonial Frontier, 2002

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Labor of Love

http://blackbird-designs.blogspot.com/2010/09/labor-of-love.html


This isn't current but is so cute.

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I hope your week has gone well. Have a safe weekend. 

I only just heard of the tragedy that happened in Oregon while writing this blog Thur. evening. So very sad. Pray for the safety of all schools and students everywhere. So many troubled people in our world not being able to find help. 

Be grateful.

betty

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